Rockhampton Mater Hospital QLD

APPOINTMENT

Evidence of Suitability

CLIENT

Mode

OVERVIEW

The subject building was proposed for additions and alterations. The linen chute was proposed to be relocated and pass through the floor slab of Level 2 and a common wall of Level 1 in the Central Sterile Services Department (CSSD) building. The building architect identified that the penetrations through floor slab and wall for linen chute might compromise the Fire Resistance Level (FRL) of the floor and wall, and therefore, would not comply with National Construction Code, Volume One, Deemed-to-Satisfy provision.

In response to the architect’s concern, the identified issue was analysed. The assessment demonstrated that the proposed arrangement of linen chute was not expected to reduce the fire rating of the floor and wall. Linen chute ducts were proposed to be covered with fire retardant coating to provide an FRL of specified value. Penetrations through floor slab were also proposed for suitable lining around chute, fire stop sealant, and fire pillows to cap between slab opening and chute. Charge and discharge openings in linen chute were protected by a self-closing fire door.

Nambour Hospital QLD

APPOINTMENT

Fire Engineering

CLIENT

Nambour Hospital

DESIGN TEAM MEMBERS

Architects: Suters Architects
Consultants: Project Services
Building Certifier: TT Building Consultants

OVERVIEW

It was proposed to renovate level 2 of Building 1 at Nambour Hospital to create a cancer Care Clinic for the public. The Cancer Care Clinic was proposed to occupy an area of approximately 500 m2 for a day care facility.

The Building Certifier had identified non-conformity with the Deemed-to-Satisfy provisions of Building Code of Australia in relation to extended travel distances to a point of choice. Smoke separation was proposed for new Cancer Care Clinic by providing a fire blanket having a fire resistance level of -/60/60.

St Andrew’s Toowoomba Hospital Stage 2 QLD

APPOINTMENT

Fire Engineering and Performance Solutions

CLIENT

St Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba

DESIGN TEAM MEMBERS

Architects: Barry Swain
Engineers: Kehoe Myers Consulting Engineers
Building Certifier: QPDP

OVERVIEW

A new building providing for a radiotherapy unit, car park area and a future ward area was proposed to be built at St. Andrew’s Hospital, Toowoomba. This new building proposed to be located at the east of the existing east ward block. The new building contains a basement car park level, radiotherapy facility level and a health care ward area on the top level.

Fire Check Consultants were engaged to provide fire safety engineering report in relation to –

  • Develop an alternative solution for the extended travel distance from the radiotherapy ‘the bunker area’;
  • A qualitative review of the need for a sprinkler system;
  • A qualitative review of the need for a smoke exhaust system;
  • A qualitative review of the effect of the rise in storeys on the evacuation of building occupants for a building with exits passing through other floors compared to this building solution;
  • Deletion of fire sprinkler system as required by the Building Code of Australia (BCA) for a new block;
  • Deletion of smoke exhaust system as required by the BCA for a new block; and
  • Deletion of fire isolation and pressurisation of staircase.

This report was prepared based on the International Fire Engineering Guidelines. The comparison between the requirements of a Deemed-to-Satisfy and alternative solution for the extension at St. Andrew’s Hospital Toowoomba were presented.

Cleveland Forest Place QLD

APPOINTMENT

Fire Engineering

CLIENT

FKP Pty Ltd

OVERVIEW

Openings (external windows) were proposed through external walls of proposed fire compartments (bedroom and kitchen). Fire Check Consultants quantitatively analysed the openings that represent the worst-case conditions in relation to exposure to other units through open space. For the purposes of fire simulation modelling, enclosures within the fire compartment were characterised. Hand calculations and fire simulation modelling were employed to determine the peak fire temperature and smoke temperature inside the units. The identified peak fire temperature was then used in a heat flux fire simulation model to determine if fire spread is possible by heat radiation to the opposite units through open space.

The performance clause was satisfied by demonstrating that openings proposed through the external walls of different fire compartments will not cause the spread of fire by heat radiation. The solution was to provide heat radiation screens placed over the openings (windows) within 6 m of each other and within different fire compartments.